Bill Passes Committee: Nullifying FDA Restrictions For Terminally Ill Patients


A Bill in Connecticut is seeking to end some FDA restrictions for terminally ill patients who would like to venture into possibly trying  “UN-approved” treatment methods for their illness. The bill, which passed by 24-2, would nullify some FDA rules which are currently in place to prevent and deny access for patients who want to use experimental treatments. The legislation in question, HB5270, was introduced just last month by a collective of six representatives and senators.

 

As it stands currently, some patients are able to bypass those restrictions by first receiving approval from the FDA. But the new bill would allow it so that patients could obtain the drugs without first having to go through the process of waiting for FDA approval to do so. When it comes to trying drugs that have no proven track record of success, the decision will ultimately rest with the individual in that HB5270 will shield physicians from liability even though they might prescribe the drugs.

 

There is already similar legislation in a number of other states, like Alabama, Oregon, South Dakota, Virginia, Montana, North Carolina, Minnesota, Louisiana, Florida, and others. They are commonly referred to as “Right-to-try” laws and these laws allow for terminally ill patients to use experimental drugs which have already completed Phase 1 of testing but might not have been approved by the FDA officially and allowed to proceed to market. Many see these laws as affording the patients with one last chance to try and seek a solution.

 

 

There are a number of different treatments that an individual might want to employ if they were facing an incurable illness and possible threat of death. From natural and holistic avenues or even simple fasting and praying, to extreme pharmaceutical treatment options; an individual has a choice of which avenue they might want to go in. This bill expands their options in allowing them to access treatment without first having to seek FDA approval where they otherwise might have had to wait and do so.


There may be risks with taking experimental drugs, but shouldn't the decision rest with the individual seeing as it is their body and they pay the consequences? Some see present FDA restrictions as inhumane because they would allow for an individual to die rather than afford them the liberty to make the choice of trying an option that might help them in some way. This current bill, HB5270, will be moving forward to the House now for consideration.



Check Out Dan's Previous Work Interviewing Rick Simpson, Discussing Alternative Cancer Treatment:

 

 

 




References:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right-to-try_law

https://www.cga.ct.gov/2016/TS/h/2016HB-05270-R00PH-CV108-TS.htm

http://openstates.org/ct/bills/2016/HB5270/ 


*Be Advised*

The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice; the Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

In the event of a medical emergency, call a doctor or 911 immediately. This website does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on the Site. Reliance on any information provided by this website is solely at your own risk. 


 

Follow Dan Dicks:
Facebook
Twitter
Dan Dicks Twitter
Dan Dicks Instagram

Subscribe:
Youtube
Press For Truth TV


If you do not use PayPal or credit cards you can still donate! We accept checks, money orders, cash and equipment. With good old fashion mail you can send Dan stuff to:

Mail to Dan Dicks:
505-8840 210th Street
Langley BC, V1M 2Y2
Canada

pat_banner.png ribbonDonateBitcoin.png paypal_large1.gif


Add Pingback
blog comments powered by Disqus